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AUGUST 13, 2020 //     

Want to Do More Than Vote in the 2020? Get Out and Volunteer!

By: Kay Brungs Laud

The 2020 election is less than three months away, and COVID-19 pandemic and social justice movement continue to grip most of the nation. Many questions remain: How will governments and political organizations best support voters, how will election day look and will votes be cast in person or by mail? 

It might seem like one person can’t make a big impact when faced with so much uncertainty, but there are several ways you can get involved to make a difference. However, when you start investigating ways to volunteer, it can often feel even more confusing and challenging as you try to find the right fit. Before you commit to anything, self-evaluate to assess your goals, your comfort level and what you hope to achieve through volunteering. Start by asking yourself the following questions:

  • How much time can I commit?
  • What are the goals I hope to achieve by volunteering?
  • Do I feel comfortable volunteering in person, or would I prefer to help virtually?
  • Is there a candidate or a specific ballot issue I’m most passionate about?
  • Do I care more about local, state or federal candidates?
  • Am I comfortable talking to potential voters?
  • Am I willing to travel out of my city or state?
  • Would I prefer to support a political party or nonpartisan organizations?

Thinking through and answering these questions should help narrow down the work you’ll be most passionate about supporting. Then, consider the following ways to get involved in this year’s election.

Support Voter Access

As discussed in my last blog, “Feeling Overwhelmed by The Enormity of How to Impact Real Change?,” the ability to cast a ballot is a remarkable privilege and one we must protect to ensure others have access to voting. We need to help expand access and information for people to cast their ballots. One of the ways you can help is by making calls to your governorsecretary of state or the state Board of Elections. Ask them two critical questions:

  1. Is an absentee ballot available so I can vote safely during the public health crisis?
  2. What have they done to ensure safe and broadly accessible elections for all?

Tell these officials you are a constituent and concerned the upcoming elections won’t be conducted in a way that allows all voters to participate. On a federal level, you can call your senator to voice your opinion about the Voting Rights Advancement Act of 2019. The bill passed the House of Representatives and is now in the Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

Work the Polls

If you are comfortable volunteering in person and communicating with voters, consider signing up to be a poll worker. Election workers are essential to ensure our elections are successful, and concerns grow about poll worker shortages this year, as TIME recently reported. Many cities and states need volunteers, especially younger people to volunteer as poll workers for in-person early voting and election day. If you are interested in becoming an election worker at the polls, you can learn more about the requirements through the U.S. Election Assistance Committee. Its website details eligibility requirements and offers tips on how to work with your local election official to get involved.

Register Voters

Is one of your objectives to help get more people vote in November? If so, look for an organization that can set you up with the tools to register family, friends, neighbors and strangers to vote. There are lots of groups to choose from, such as HeadCount, League of Women Voters, When We All Vote or Vote Latino. You can also make sure your friends or family who live abroad or serve in the military overseas are registered to vote and receive an absentee ballot. The U.S. Vote Foundation can help provide all the information they need.

Canvass for a Candidate or an Issue

Are you passionate about a certain candidate or ballot issue and social distancing has you looking for new ways of connecting with people? Then think about reaching out to a candidate’s or a ballot issue’s campaign office to find out how to get involved. Campaigns rely on volunteers and need people to help with their Get Out the Vote (GOTV) efforts. GOTV activities can range for helping register voters to making calls, to answering questions about the candidate or ballot issue, to making sure people know when, where and how to vote, to putting up signs, to helping with fundraising, and even making meals for the staff and team of volunteers.

There are many other ways you can get involved and support this year’s elections. However, if you don’t have the time or interest to volunteer, please make sure you are registered to vote, have researched the candidates and the issues, and cast your ballot on or before Tuesday, Nov. 3!

Kay Brungs Laud is a senior vice president and works out of Allison+Partners’ Chicago office. Prior to her career in public relations, she lived in Washington, D.C., where she spent several years working on the Hill and was part of two presidential campaigns. She graduated from American University with a bachelor’s degree in Political Science.

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